Sunday, 30 October 2011

How do you feel when the bells begin to peal?

From ERIC SHACKLE, in Sydney, Australia.<ericshackleATbigpond.com>


You'd have to be pretty long in the tooth to remember a
catchy pop tune of the 1920s called Ever So Goosey.
 

It was written by two Australians, Wright Butler and
Raymond Wallace, and was performed by Ray Starita
and his Ambassadors Band.

Here are the lyrics of what was called a comedy song:


How do you feel when you marry your ideal?

Ever so goosey, goosey, goosey, goosey.

How do you feel when the bells begin to peal?

Ever so goosey, goosey, goosey, goosey.

Walking up the aisle, in a kind of daze,

Do you get the wind up when the organ plays?

How do you feel when the parson's done the deal?

Ever so goosey, goosey, goosey, goosey.

 
Ray Wallace also composed an equally popular song, "All good friends and

jolly good company
" in 1931.

It has been recorded by many artists including Randolph Sutton, Ella Shields, Paul Whitman and Jack Hylton and his Orchestra with vocalist Pat O'Malley.


Here we are again, happy as can be

All good friends and jolly good company

Driving round the town, out upon a spree

All good friends and jolly good company

Never mind the weather, never mind the rain

Now we're all together, whoops she goes again

La Dee dah Dee dah, la Dee dah Dee Dee

All good friends and jolly good company


When those songs were in their infancy, errand boys 

would whistle the tunes while riding their bikes.

Today's boys still ride bikes, but they don't run errands. 

Sadly, some of them don't even know how to whistle a lively tune.

1 comment:

  1. My gran used to sing "when you step on orange peel-ever so juicy juicy jucy"

    ReplyDelete